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Further insight into the sound-producing mechanism of clownfishes: what structure is involved in sound radiation?
Colleye, O.; Nakamura, M.; Frédérich, B.; Parmentier, E. (2012). Further insight into the sound-producing mechanism of clownfishes: what structure is involved in sound radiation? J. Exp. Biol. 215(13): 2192-2202. dx.doi.org/10.1242/jeb.067124
In: Journal of Experimental Biology. Cambridge University Press: London. ISSN 0022-0949; e-ISSN 1477-9145, meer
Peer reviewed article  

Beschikbaar in  Auteurs 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 257529 [ OMA ]

Trefwoorden
    Amphiprion clarkii (Bennett, 1830) [WoRMS]
    Marien
Author keywords
    Amphiprion clarkii; sound production; swimbladder; rib cage; resonance

Auteurs  Top 
  • Colleye, O., meer
  • Nakamura, M.
  • Frédérich, B., meer
  • Parmentier, E., meer

Abstract
    It was recently demonstrated that clownfishes produce aggressive sounds by snapping their jaw teeth. To date, only the onset of the sound has been studied, which raises the question, what structure is involved in sound radiation? Here, a combination of different approaches has been used to determine the anatomical structure(s) responsible for the size-related variations observed in sound duration and frequency. Filling the swimbladder with physiological liquid specifically modified size-related acoustic features by inducing a significant decrease in pulse duration of approximately 3 ms and a significant increase in dominant frequency of approximately 105 Hz. However, testing the acoustics of the swimbladder by striking it with a piezoelectric impact hammer showed that this structure is a highly damped sound source prevented from prolonged vibrations. In contrast, the resonant properties of the rib cage seems to account for the size-related variations observed in acoustic features. For an equivalent strike on the rib cage, the duration and dominant frequency of induced sounds changed with fish size: sound duration and dominant frequency were positively and negatively correlated with fish size, respectively. Such relationships between sonic features and fish size are consistent with those observed in natural sounds emitted by fish. Therefore, the swimbladder itself does not act as a resonator; its wall just seems to be driven by the oscillations of the rib cage. This set of observations suggests the need for reassessment of the acoustic role of swimbladders in various fish species.

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